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10 Statistics Magazine Publishers Should Keep in Mind

  |  June 21, 2013   |  Comments

Cut through the sea of data and get focused on the top 10 statistics that you need to consider when building your publishing strategies in the digital arena.

Creating a successful future for digital magazines means you need to be able to pay attention to three unique trends at the same time: technology, age, and attention. Open just about any website these days and you will find more research, recommendations, and data on these three areas than you might know what to do with. It is a sea of statistics.

One positive note is that there is some stability for our world. The content magazine publishers create is, and will continue to be, the one constant we can count on. After all, it is the high-quality content that creates the core of the magazine brand. But once you decide to take that content into the digital world, everything changes.

Cut through the sea of data and get focused on the top 10 statistics that you need to consider when building your publishing strategies in the digital arena. But keep up, because these statistics change about every nine months as consumer behavior and technology choices change. So keep refreshing these stats and your outreach strategy to ensure you are reaching the right audience on the right device at the right time.

The top 10 statistics for driving publishing success are:

  1. 91 percent of affluent online males use a PC every day, compared to 77 percent for smartphones, and 50 percent for tablets. (Source: "Luxury Marketing: The Digital Anatomy of the Affluent Male")
  2. About one-sixth (16 percent) of the 235 million adults in the United States report that they have seen or read business/financial/economic/investment news in the past 30 days. Among all adults, television and magazines are "tied" as the platforms that reach the most adults for this category of news. Tied in the bottom position are the digital platforms for watching this type of news - computers, tablets, and smartphones. Those who read this category are somewhat more oriented toward consuming it on their computers..(Source: Shullman Research Center)
  3. 78 percent of U.S. adults in households with annual incomes of $75,000 and over own smartphones. (Source: Pew Internet)
  4. The iPad holds 88 percent of tablet web traffic, followed by Amazon's Kindle Fire at 3.6 percent. (Source: Chitika)
  5. 50 percent of tablet owners prefer to read news, magazines, and books on screen, rather than on paper. (Source: Gartner)
  6. Americans use an average of three screen combinations per day. (Source: Google)
  7. Mobile Internet users spend an average of 117 minutes per day online on their devices, and 140 minutes on their desktop PCs or laptops. (Source: CMO Council)
  8. 46 percent of tablet owners spend more than $20 per month on purchases made from their devices, compared to 30 percent for smartphones. (Source: IAB)
  9. 23 percent of smartphone owners prefer to use a website for shopping, compared to 14 percent for apps. (Source: BIA/Kelsey)
  10. 40 percent of male smartphone owners have shared their locations with retailers, versus 25 percent of females. (Source: Shop.org)

Image on home page via Shutterstock.



Jeanniey Mullen

Jeanniey Mullen is the vice president of marketing at NOOK by Barnes and Noble, focused on business growth and customer acquisition. 

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