Break Media Launches New Sites, Ad Network

Guys video site Break.com has launched several new properties and a vertical ad network in recent months, becoming Break Media. Supported by Adify, the network pools inventory from twelve outside properties catering to the same crowd of boob men, auto enthusiasts and extreme sports fans that favors its flagship brand.

Break execs hope recently launched in-house sites Cage Potato, Holy Taco, and Chickipedia will grow quickly through cross-promotion on Break.com. Through their development CEO Keith Richman says the company aims to enhance the advertising appeal of the ad network, which consists of lesser-known destinations like BarstoolSports.com, BubbleBox.com, and BuzzHumor.com. Richman said all those sites have at least 150,000 monthly uniques and a generally loyal audience.

“The challenge is to keep it premium,” he said. “It helps to start with wholly owned brands that are premium as well.”

While Break sells ads based on Internet Advertising Bureau standards, its sales focus is on creative placements and branded content. Like rival Heavy.com, the company specializes in loud and imposing creative executions that seem to go over well with young men. Last Friday, for instance, a branded placement for the new Rambo flick dominated Break.com’s front page, while network partner LifeOnTop played host to a tight video integration with Tequila brand Partida, called “Tequila Confessions.”

Break.com has worked with advertisers including Axe, Diageo, Jim Beam, MTV, and HBO. That site has 13 million monthly uniques, of which 60 percent live in the U.S., according to Quantcast. The measurement firm also reports regular visitors to the site make up nearly 75 percent of its total impressions. December data from ComScore meanwhile credit Break Media with 17 million uniques in the U.S., which the company says is “substantially lower” than its own internal reporting.

Break.com is among the latest publisher to amass inventory by creating a vertical ad network for smaller category sites. The splashiest of these are from female-focused media companies like Glam, iVillage, and Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. And, the environmental/green lifestyle segment recently sprouted two Adify-powered networks, Matter Network and SustainLane, as well.

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