The Art of Conversion: 5 Free Conversion Tools for Marketing Professionals

The Art of Conversion isn’t usually one of those in-your-face, loud “aha!” moments. Instead, it typically comes down to relatively small, incremental gains and continuous adaptation and improvements. Or, as Thomas Edison once said, “I have not failed 10,000 times. I have successfully found 10,000 ways that will not work.”

However, with the insanely intensified workload placed on marketing pros these days, coupled with the demands to always be improving conversion rates, we could all use a little help when it comes to improving our processes – even if just a bit here and there.

But with new productivity-focused apps and marketing automation start-ups popping up every month, it would be impossible to keep up on every new tool, let alone find ways to incorporate all of them into your workflow. Here are five free conversion tools that require minimal effort and help give your conversion rates a little boost without breaking the bank:

1. HubSpot: HubSpot offers an awesome free resource for marketers and writers. It’s a blog topic (and title) generator that helps kick-start ideas when you run short on inspiration for what to write about next. All you have to do is provide three nouns that you’d like to write about, and the generator comes up with five relevant blog post titles.

2. Lander: Lander is an easy-to-use, drag-and-drop-style landing page builder with templates designed for conversion. You can A/B test different versions of your landing pages to figure out the most effective way to convert site visitors into customers. The entry-level, free plan allows for up to 500 visitors per month to the pages.

3. InboundWriter: InboundWriter is a content optimization tool that uses real-time intelligence and SEO rules to help develop a strategy before and while you start writing any content (blog post, news article, e-book, etc.) By describing the topic you want to write about, InboundWriter uses a semantics algorithm to help fine-tune and discover keyword terms that are highly specific to your topic.

4. Content Experiments: Google Analytics offers Content Experiments to help marketers improve conversion rates on their websites. With Content Experiments, you’re able to compare how different versions of a Web page perform based on testing certain objectives. Content Experiments goes beyond traditional A/B testing and uses an A/B/N testing approach, which means you have the ability to test up to five versions of a single page.

5. Copy Hackers: The blog over at Copy Hackers is a marketing gold mine. It offers conversion rate optimization (CRO) tips to cover it all – Web copy, call to actions, formatting, Ad words, and more. One of the newest tools they offer for free is a “Headline Scorecard” that helps you determine if your landing page headline is optimized.

The Art of Conversion

Conversion rates are a lot like people, really. You put them out into the world and hope for the best. As time goes on and you have interactions with new people, you start to figure out what works and what doesn’t – in regards to how you present yourself to the outside world.

When you crack a funny joke or say something clever and get a good response from people around you, it makes sense to keep doing that. And when you lose your cool and do something not so great, hopefully you learn from that, too, and try not to do it again.

It’s the same with conversion rates. The whole thing is a learning process. It’s about paying attention to the journey and picking up new insight as you go along. There isn’t one magic answer that will solve all conversion challenges. Each website, industry, and organization faces unique challenges in turning site visitors into paying customers. And so it’s all about taking the ride and becoming an expert at applying everything learned as you move forward.

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