StatsAd Industry MetricsGoogle Android Gains on Apple in Smartphone Ad Share

Google Android Gains on Apple in Smartphone Ad Share

Android grows portion of U.S. smartphone ad requests as iPhone share shrinks.

Speaking with ClickZ last week, AdMob’s VP of advertising sales, Tony Nethercutt, said the company was beginning to see Google’s Android operating system attacking the dominance of Apple devices across its network. Supporting that comment, the company’s recent monthly metrics reports suggest the Android operating system is growing its share of U.S. smartphone ad requests, largely at the expense of the iPhone.

In January, iPhone devices accounted for 47 percent of ad requests across the AdMob network. That represents growth of a single percentage point from December 2009, but a significant dip compared with the 55 percent share achieved in November.

By contrast, the share of handsets running Android was up three percentage points during January, accounting for 39 percent of requests from smartphones overall. Between November and January, Android’s overall share of requests grew by 12 percentage points.

Mobile Operating Systems by Share of Smartphone Ad Requests
Operating System Share of Ad Requests in Nov 2009 (%) Share of Ad Requests in Dec 2009 (%) Share of Ad Requests in Jan 2010 (%)
iPhone OS 55 46 47
Android 27 36 39
RIM OS 10 9 7
Windows Mobile OS 3 3 2
Other 5 6 5
Source: AdMob, 2010

However, this data does not include requests from iPod Touch devices, since they do not include phone functionality. In January, iPod Touch devices accounted for 20.8 percent of all ad requests across AdMob’s network, compared with the 23 percent accrued by the iPhone. That data suggests the iPhone OS — on which both the iPod and iPhone run — ultimately accounts for a far greater portion of ad requests when compared with the Android OS.

BlackBerry operating system RIM OS, and Microsoft’s Windows Mobile OS both experienced a decline in their share of ad requests, month-over-month.

Methodology: AdMob classifies a phone as a smartphone when it has an identifiable operating system. Despite running the iPhone OS, the iPod Touch is not a phone, and thus not considered a smartphone based on this definition.

Related Articles

The evolution of display: How is advertisers' use of display advertising changing?

Ad Industry Metrics The evolution of display: How is advertisers' use of display advertising changing?

1y Rebecca Sentance
What can advertising spend tell us about the future of social networks?

Ad Industry Metrics What can advertising spend tell us about the future of social networks?

1y Rebecca Sentance
Breaking down the Facebook auction: How to manage rising CPMs and deliver sales

Actionable Analysis Breaking down the Facebook auction: How to manage rising CPMs and deliver sales

1y Clark Boyd
Our four favourite findings from the ClickZ Digital Advertising Breakfast

Actionable Analysis Our four favourite findings from the ClickZ Digital Advertising Breakfast

1y Leonie Mercedes
YouTube is getting rid of 30-second unskippable pre-roll ads

Ad Industry Metrics YouTube is getting rid of 30-second unskippable pre-roll ads

1y Al Roberts
Ad blocker use continues to grow rapidly

Ad Industry Metrics Ad blocker use continues to grow rapidly

2y Al Roberts
The Year Ahead: Top Resolutions for Digital Advertisers

Ad Industry Metrics The Year Ahead: Top Resolutions for Digital Advertisers

2y Chad Bronstein
Do ad blockers hold the clue to the future of advertising?

Ad Industry Metrics Do ad blockers hold the clue to the future of advertising?

2y Tim Flagg