More NewsSpam Recycling Center Turns Over 150,000 E-mails to FTC

Spam Recycling Center Turns Over 150,000 E-mails to FTC

The Spam Recycling Center (SRC) delivered adatabase of 150,000 unsolicited commercial e-mail messages to CongressmanGary Miller (R-CA) and the Federal Trade Commission in an effort to encouragea ban on spam and to help the FTC track down and prosecute e-mail con artists.

The Spam Recycling Center (SRC) delivered a database of 150,000 unsolicited commercial email messages to Congressman Gary Miller (R-CA) and the Federal Trade Commission in an effort to encourage a ban on spam and to help the FTC track down and prosecute email con artists.

The messages were collected from Netizens over the past two months at the SRC Web site, a public education and anti-spam awareness effort sponsored by ChooseYourMail.com, the Coalition Against Unsolicited Commercial Email , the Forum for Responsible and Ethical Email and SAFEeps.

“The overwhelming consumer response to the Recycling Center and the questionable nature of the spams we’ve received tells me that the spam problem is growing,” said Ian Oxman, president of ChooseYourMail.com.

“Between the get-rich-quick schemes, the invitations to pornographic sites, and the potential dissemination of computer viruses, spam is turning ‘buyer beware’ into ‘run for your life.’ Consumers shouldn’t have to fear opening their email boxes and that is why we are supporting Rep. Gary Miller’s Can Spam Act,” Oxman said

ChooseYourMail’s preliminary analysis of the SRC spam database indicates that 30.2 percent of the spams collected were promoting pornographic sites.

Another 29.6 percent of the spams were dubious moneymaking proposals including, “surf the net for money”, “let your computer work for you” and unspecified “work from home” offers. The most disturbing subset of these “get-rich-quick” solicitations was the 4,200 that sold or promoted spamming as a way to make money on the Web, Oxman said.

“Not only is spam damaging the Internet infrastructure, but it’s clearly a favorite advertising vehicle for sleazy and abusive business people,” said CAUCE co-founder and vice president John Mozena. “It’s the new favorite tool of those who abuse and defraud consumers.”

Miller’s bill would allow Internet service providers to sue spammers for up to $25,000 a day for unsolicited commercial messages sent through their systems.

Related Articles

GDPR: The role of technology in data compliance

Data & Analytics GDPR: The role of technology in data compliance

3w Clark Boyd
What companies can learn from the We-Vibe lawsuit about the Internet of Things

Legal & Regulatory What companies can learn from the We-Vibe lawsuit about the Internet of Things

8m Al Roberts
Has advertising arrived on Google Home?

Media Has advertising arrived on Google Home?

8m Al Roberts
Is Twitter slowly dying?

More News Is Twitter slowly dying?

9m Al Roberts
FedEx launches fulfillment service to take on Amazon

Ecommerce FedEx launches fulfillment service to take on Amazon

9m Al Roberts
Target is the top retail digital marketer, so why is it struggling?

Ecommerce Target is the top retail digital marketer, so why is it struggling?

8m Al Roberts
YouTube is "on pace to eclipse TV" thanks to savvy algorithm use

More News YouTube is "on pace to eclipse TV" thanks to savvy algorithm use

9m Al Roberts
YouTube is getting rid of 30-second unskippable pre-roll ads

Ad Industry Metrics YouTube is getting rid of 30-second unskippable pre-roll ads

9m Al Roberts