More NewsUPDATE: Dow Drops CNBC Ads, But Where Are the Fox Biz Ads?

UPDATE: Dow Drops CNBC Ads, But Where Are the Fox Biz Ads?

Where are the ads for the just-launched Fox Business Network on WSJ.com and MarketWatch.com? The NY Times reported Dow Jones dropped ads it was supposed to run for CNBC today to replace them with FBN ads

foxbusiness.gifWhere are the ads for the just-launched Fox Business Network on WSJ.com and MarketWatch.com? The NY Times reported Dow Jones dropped ads it was supposed to run for CNBC today to replace them with FBN ads. I haven’t seen any full-page units or road blocks for the new Fox property on those sites yet, though that was what the story indicated we’d see.

From the NY Times story:
“Last Tuesday night, CNBC’s ad buyers received a call from a Dow Jones representative saying that those ads could not run today, the first day of Fox’s competing channel.

In the case of MarketWatch, CNBC had bought both an introduction ad for the site – meaning that every user on the site today would have seen an ad for CNBC before getting to the MarketWatch home page – as well as what is called a “road block” of ads – meaning CNBC would have been the exclusive advertiser on the site’s home page today.

The decision to drop the ads from the Wall Street Journal site was even more significant because CNBC has been advertising on the site’s market data page every day since Oct. 1 and had a deal for ads to run daily for two months. The CNBC ads on the market data page were also to be removed for today only.”

Of course, the decision is a result of Fox parent co. NewsCorp’s acquisition of Dow Jones.

But where are the FBN ads? It’s interesting that Dow Jones would, as was noted in the story, “disappoint” its longtime advertiser CNBC by not running its ads, but then not run FBN ads either. What’s the point?

Dow Jones & Company PR sent me a statement (the same one it apparently sent to the Times), and wouldn’t tell me a whole lot beyond verifying the NY Times story: “As is standard practice, we retain the right to adjust the precise placement and timing of online advertisements, including to accommodate links from other Web sites.”

UPDATE:Today the NY Times has a follow-up noting, “Both MarketWatch and The Wall Street Journal’s Web site, WSJ.com, filled up the exact spaces CNBC had purchased with rotating ads that included some for Fox Business Network. These were accompanied by links to foxbusiness.com, the Web site of the Fox Business Network. The ads for Fox started running soon after midnight.”

I didn’t see these ads at all when checking those sites for my original post. I didn’t see any roadblocks on either WSJ.com or MarketWatch either. I’m not doubting the NY Times reporter saw them, but I didn’t yesterday.

The WSJ itself has a good report on the CNBC ad buy, including the cost for one day of exclusivity originally intended to confront the Oct. 15 Fox Biz launch: $59,500 for all MarketWatch.com ad space, and $27,500 for roadblocks served before users reached the site’s homepage.

Today, WSJ.com is sponsored by Dell, which is running a roadblock and display ads from the computer maker on the site, making all of its content free today. MarketWatch is also running those roadblocks.

Since this thing blew up yesterday, I have yet to see any CNBC ads or Fox ads on those sites, personally. I’m trying to make heads or tails or it all, but at this point, one thing’s for sure: online advertising obviously is important enough to spark a lot of headlines and controversy. If anything, the wrangling gives more legitimacy to the medium and the industry.

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