Digital MarketingDisplay AdvertisingPre-Debate, Planned Parenthood Aims Anti-Romney Ads in Denver

Pre-Debate, Planned Parenthood Aims Anti-Romney Ads in Denver

The pro-choice organization is blanketing The Denver Post's Politics home page today with display ads encouraging voters to "Ask Mitt where he stands on women's health."

plannedparenthood-denver-debate2As Mitt Romney’s campaign hopes to steer tonight’s first presidential debate conversation to economic issues like taxes, government regulation, and the debt, Planned Parenthood has another idea. The pro-choice organization is blanketing The Denver Post’s Politics home page today with display ads encouraging voters to “Ask Mitt where he stands on women’s health.”

The women’s vote is crucial, and healthcare issues related to women will more than likely be among President Obama’s talking points tonight during the much-awaited tête-à-tête, to be held in Denver, Colorado.

Planned Parenthood Votes has spent more than $28,000 in recent days on online advertising opposing Mitt Romney according to Federal Election Commission filings analyzed by ClickZ Politics. It is unclear how much of that total has gone toward the DenverPost.com buy.

Like so many campaign and advocacy group efforts this election season, The Planned Parenthood display ads are coupled with a social media element. The ads link to a landing page highlighting the #AskMitt hashtag. In turn, the group is targeting Promoted Tweets against searches for the tag on Twitter.

The Planned Parenthood Votes landing page asks people to vote for one of five questions to pose to the GOP presidential hopeful such as “To @MittRomney: If you repeal Obamacare, what happens to 45 million women who would lose preventive care w/ no co-pays?” The vote request is a tactic used to gather a name and email address from supporters, and the vote function generates a tweet promoting the campaign that uses the #AskMitt hashtag.

The Romney camp – as it has many times since the Republican National Convention in August – has purchased today’s Promoted Trend in the hopes of influencing the Twittersphere to talk about economic issues through the #CantAfford4More tag. During the debate, expect Romney himself to focus as much as possible on the sluggish economy during Obama’s administration, along with subjects such as jobs and the national debt.

Advertisers typically purchase Promoted Trends months ahead of when they are set to run, according to Twitter Chief Revenue Officer Adam Bain, speaking at a Twitter event this morning during Advertising Week in New York City. He said advertisers often plan Promo Trend buys on a quarterly or even an annual basis.

Of course, while political advertisers may buy the ad unit weeks or months ahead of time, the actual messaging is probably determined in a much more timely manner.

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